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Rewarding and Lucrative: Health Care Administration

Graphic about new Health Care jobs

 

Earn your Health Care Administration Degree at Mandl School.

Earning a Health Care Administration degree can lead to a rewarding and potentially lucrative career as a health care administrator or manager in the fast-paced health industry. Demand for health care is rising, creating exciting job opportunities across the United States.

 

Employment.

Associates Degree in Healthcare Administration programs provide students with the skills that are necessary for them to acquire entry-level employment in the healthcare industry. For the most part, individuals who acquire an Associates Degree in Healthcare Administration are rewarded with quick access to an array of entry-level healthcare administration job opportunities.

 

Earn impressive starting salaries.

According to https://work.chron.com, those who earn associate degrees in health care administration become health care administrators, or medical and health services managers, as the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics classifies them. Health care administrators work in hospitals, nursing homes, outpatient care centers and clinics. They oversee all operations in these facilities, managing their budgets and developing growth strategies for increasing revenue. Health care administrators with associate degrees can earn starting salaries averaging nearly $70,000 annually.

 

Mandl Career Services can help.

Mandl Career Services department is focused on helping graduates find the best possible jobs and career paths.  Health care administrators can earn higher starting salaries working for different types of facilities, especially those in which medical and health services managers earn more such as specialty hospitals, cancer and cardiac care facilities and surgical hospitals. Health care administrators may also earn more in larger medical facilities, which typically have more financial resources to support their higher salaries.

 

Job Outlook looks great.

The BLS projects a 22-percent increase in jobs for medical and health care managers, faster than the 14-percent average for all occupations. Increases in demand for medical services should boost jobs for health care managers and administrators, especially as the comparatively large baby boom population ages. Applicants will likely find more available jobs in doctors’ offices and nursing homes as medical technologies improve.

 

Contact Mandl School.

Contact Mandl School about our Health Care Administration degree program, We will talk to you about getting started, Career Services and much more. Call 212-247-3434 to speak with a Mandl representative today or fill our form and we will get back to you right away.

A growing population that lives longer

Perfect for a career in Health Care:

Health Care is one of the fastest growing careers.

According to most studies of careers and “top careers of the future,” Health Care is one of the fastest growing fields in the United States. There are a few reasons for this conclusion, the first is that people are living longer.  In addition, the population is growing. This means more people, living longer lives, all needing health care. Lastly, many of the jobs necessary on Health Care cannot be automated. They need to be administered and assessed by a real person so human resources are needed and the prediction is that they will be needed for many years to come. This is creating a huge demand for professionals across the spectrum of the health care industry.

Serve a vital social need and start a career.

Because of this, your choosing a career in health care is not only smart from a matter of practicality, but also serves a vital social need. These days you do not necessarily need to pursue a clinical role, such as a doctor or nurse, to find a stable niche in health care. There are many ways to help serve patients and the wider community from the perspective of health and wellness. One way is to start your career in health care by pursuing an Associates Degree offered by Mandl School.

You can be working 2 years faster than those getting a 4 year degree.

If you are eager to get started in a health care career but don’t want to spend a lot of time in school, an associate’s degree program can get started in approximately two years.  At Mandl, we offer our students internships at numerous hospitals and medical facilities so you are gaining practical experience even before you graduate. An associate’s degree enables you to put a credential on your resume and start working in your field two years before your peers, who chose to pursue a four-year bachelor’s degree.

An associate’s degree in health science is not merely a stepping-stone. It launches a fulfilling career that will serve you for a lifetime. However, if you additional career ambitions, your education can help you continue towards a bachelors degree and your experience will certainly help you continue your career journey.

Health Care careers are some of the most well-paying jobs in the world.

Health care careers embody some of the most gratifying and well-paying jobs in the world, according to such reputable resources as Forbes and Business Insider. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts strong growth rates and pay-scales for all-cumulatively, healthcare careers have a 19% predicted growth rate (much faster than average) with an average annual salary of about $65,000/yr. Over the next 8-10 years, these statistics represent over 2.3 million jobs.

Contact Mandl School.

For more information about a career in Health Care and Mandl School, contact us at 2121-247-3434 or fill out our contact form and a Mandl Representative will reach out to you ASAP.

 

May is a great time for Health Care Education

Mandl School College of Allied Health Careers

May is a great time to start your health care education.  Few months during the year celebrate the hard work, dedication and importance of health care than May. There are 11+ days honoring awareness of health related issues and each deserves attention, especially from those who are in the health care industry or are studying to make health care a career. Here are a few to be aware of:

  • National Arthritis Month
  • Asthma and Food Allergy Awareness Month
  • Brain Cancer /Tumor Action Month
  • Osteoporosis Awareness & Prevention Month
  • Melanoma Skin Cancer Awareness Month
  • Lupus Awareness Month
  • Stroke Awareness Month
  • Bladder Cancer Awareness Month
  • Mental Health Awareness Month
  • Tuberous Sclerosis Awareness Month
  • Celiac Disease Awareness Month

National Nurses Week.

Another time to honor is National Nurses Day which actually becomes a full week of awareness.   Celebrations and receptions are held across the United States to honor the work of nurses from May 6th to May 12th.

Florence Nightingale

May 12, the final day of National Nurses Week, is the birthday of Florence Nightingale (1820-1910). The English nurse became known as the founder of professional nursing, especially due to her pioneering work during the Crimean War (1853-1856). Due to her habit of making rounds at night, Nightingale became known as “The Lady with the Lamp”.

National Nurses Week was first observed in October 1954, the 100th anniversary of Nightingale’s mission to Crimea. May 6 was introduced as the date for the observance in 1982.

Spring Classes are starting at Mandl School

Spring classes are starting shortly at Mandl School. While classes are filling fast, there is still time to register. The Health care industry is poised for growth faster than almost every other career. Contact Mandl today about how to get started. Call 212-247-3434 or email rsenser@mandl.edu for more information!

 

February is Heart Health Month

Hand making heart

This February is heart health month.  A time to think about a vital organ that has multiple meanings.  General health, spiritual health, love of friends and family and a time to think of others.  As one of NYC’s oldest medical training schools, we’ll focus on the health (and encourage the spirit and love!)

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. Every year, 1 in 4 deaths are caused by heart disease.  In the United States, the most common type of heart disease is coronary artery disease (CAD), which can lead to heart attack because of decreased blood flow.  Fortunately, you can greatly reduce your risk for CAD through lifestyle changes and, in some cases, medication.

The good news? Heart disease can often be prevented when people make healthy choices and manage their health conditions. Communities, health professionals, and families can work together to create opportunities for people to make healthier choices.

Make a difference in your community: Spread the word about strategies for preventing heart disease and encourage people to live heart healthy lives.

Heart Health

How can February American Heart Month make a difference?

We can use this month to raise awareness about heart disease and how people can prevent it — both at home and in the community.

Here are just a few ideas:

  • Encourage families to make small changes, like using spices to season their food instead of salt.
  • Motivate teachers and administrators to make physical activity a part of the school day. This can help students start good habits early.
  • Ask doctors and nurses to be leaders in their communities by speaking out about ways to prevent heart disease.

How can I help spread the word about Heart Health?

We’ve made it easier for you to make a difference. This toolkit is full of ideas to help you take action today. For example:

Five Types of Excessive Drinking

Excessive Drinking

With a career in Health & Human Services, you can focus on helping others. Alcohol abuse is a problem many people face and help from someone trained can be a life changing experience for all involved.

This article from Medical News Today sheds light on excessive drinking.

New research reveals five types of excessive drinking and shows which type is more prevalent at certain ages.

According to new research, there are five types of problematic drinking.
According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), approximately 16 million individuals living in the United States have alcohol use disorder (AUD).
Experts describe AUD as a “chronic relapsing brain disease” where a person drinks compulsively, often to the point of it interfering with their daily life.
However, AUD is more complex than a person simply drinking excessively.
According to the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM–5), 11 criteria help a professional decide if someone has an AUD. If the person meets two of these criteria during a 12-month period, a doctor will consider they have the condition.

New research has now added even more nuance to the issue of problematic drinking. There are five types of excessive drinking within AUD, concludes the new study, which appears in the journal Alcohol and Alcoholism.
Furthermore, each distinct profile has its own set of symptoms and tends to be more common at certain ages, the paper shows.

Ashley Linden-Carmichael led the new study. She is an assistant research professor of biobehavioral health and faculty affiliate at the Edna Bennett Pierce Prevention Research Center at Pennsylvania State University in State College, PA.

5 age-related AUD profiles revealed

Linden-Carmichael and her colleagues examined the data on 5,402 participants, aged between 18 and 64 years old, who were enrolled in the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions and had met the criteria for an AUD in the past year.

The researchers applied a new method called latent class analysis to study subtypes or “profiles” of people with an AUD, clustering together those who shared the same symptoms, as well as drinking too much. The analysis revealed five AUD classes:

• “Alcohol-induced injury” characterized 25 percent of the participants. People with this profile engaged in risky behavior and got into dangerous situations that might have caused injury.
• “Highly problematic, low perceived life interference” characterized 21 percent of the participants. This group said that their alcohol consumption did not have any adverse effect on their lives and did not affect their family, work, or social obligations, despite also reporting that they experienced many AUD symptoms.
• The “Adverse effects only” profile included 34 percent of the participants, who reported hangovers or alcohol withdrawal symptoms.
• “Difficulty cutting back” was a profile prevalent among 13 percent of the participants. People in this category struggled or were unable to cut back on their drinking.
• “Highly problematic” was the final category, which made up 7 percent of the total number of participants who had every symptom of AUD.

Additionally, the analysis revealed how common each profile was when people were at different ages.

“The adverse effects only and highly problematic, low perceived life interference classes were particularly prevalent among younger adults,” write the authors, whereas “the difficulty cutting back and alcohol-induced injury classes were more prevalent as age increased.”
The main implication of the findings, says the study’s lead author, is that we need tailored treatments for people with AUD.

“We need to think beyond whether someone has an alcohol use disorder, yes or no, and take a look specifically at what they’re struggling with and whether they’re in a particularly risky class,” says Linden-Carmichael.

“Additionally, while young adults are most at risk for an alcohol use disorder, it’s clear that it’s also an issue for people in middle age or in older adulthood, too. But it might look different, and they may be struggling with different aspects of drinking.”

 

Therapists could consider, for example, that when someone is a young adult, they should be looking for that person experiencing withdrawal symptoms […] Conversely, if someone is older, they could look for struggles with cutting back their drinking or alcohol-related injuries.”

Ashley Linden-Carmichael

The lead author also shares some of her directions for future research. “I’m interested in seeing, for example, if someone has a certain profile at a younger age, what happens to them later?” Linden-Carmichael says.
“If a person is in the adverse effects only class at 21, what does their drinking look like at age 60? Do they escalate or slow down? If we could have a similarly large study but follow them across age, that would be the most intuitive and most beneficial for practice,” concludes the researcher.

READ ARTICLE HERE

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