Make Money in Trade Career

 

Dental Assistant program at Mandl School

A Trade Career can be lucrative and rewarding. Teens need to know there are alternatives to 4 year colleges. In fact, studies are showing that there are more opportunities for skilled trade today than ever before.  Here is a great article written by Katie Bingham-Smith and published in Family Circle. Mandl School offers students an opportunity for a career focused education. The medical field is in need of employers and we offer specific training, certification prep, and degrees for some of the highest paying and most sought after careers in the US.

High paying jobs and opportunities.

High-paying jobs are available for students who choose trade school or vocational or technical education instead of bachelor’s degree programs.

My son is 15 and will be starting his junior year of high school in the fall. The talk of going to college is buzzing all around while no other options are even suggested half as much. There seems to be such a stigma around not going off to school to earn a bachelor’s ­degree, and I don’t think this is fair to our kids.

My son probably won’t go to college, at least not right away.

While I am still going to take him to visit schools to make sure it’s not what he wants to do straight after graduation, it might not change his mind about what he wants to do. For now, he feels like he wants to be a plumber like his father, and we both think that’s great.

When he was younger, he watched his dad go to work in a big truck that had different compartments and held fittings, long copper pipes, and cool PVC things that fit together like a puzzle. He loved helping him clean and organize it.

He’d take a screwdriver or wrench and sit with him under sinks when we’d drop off donuts at a job site.

As he’s gotten older, he’s gone to work with him over the years and learned how to install radiant heat, faucets, and toilets.

A Career Training education is hands on.

Career in Diagnostic Medical Sonography

My son likes to do manual labor and work hard. He’s always been happiest when he is moving his body and hates sitting in a classroom all day. The thought of going to another four years of school after graduating makes his stomach turn.

Knowing that, and seeing how his father has struggled to find good employees that know the plumbing trade, or want to work hard to learn it, has made me realize we really need to be presenting the trades as a promising career path to our kids, because they have so much to offer.

College is being shoved down their throats, and all the other options take a back seat or aren’t presented at all.

Our teens should at least know there is always a need for carpenters, plumbers, and electricians. In fact, a plumber once told me in good times, people buy and build new. And in bad times, they still need their homes to be standing and functioning properly so they hire trades-people to repair broken things—people will always need to use the bathroom and have running water.

My son’s dad has never been at a loss for work. He supported a family of five on one income by running a good plumbing business. In fact, he’s had to turn a lot of work away as he’s always had more work than he can handle.

He’s also mentioned when he does call people back to schedule a service call, they are so relieved because it’s impossible to get a plumber to come to their house.

Trades schools are a lot less expensive than four-year colleges, and lots of companies are willing to train the right person with the right work ethic. Many of our kids can get into a lucrative career, start earning money, and learn great skills right out of high school without taking on much (or any) debt.

This can allow them to earn great money to think longer and harder about what they want to do while gaining the knowledge that will help them later in life; learning to fix something yourself can save thousands a year.

Life Opportunities

Maybe they want to save for school and go later after they have gotten a feel for earning a living. Perhaps they want to work for a bit and earn enough money to travel. There is also the option to work during the day and take classes at night a bit at a time and pay as they go.

I also can’t count the times I’ve tried to find a good handyman, and when I do find one, he is usually straight out because he has so much work and has a hard time hiring someone to help him.

The trades are such a wonderful option for our kids. They are needed, they pay well, and the skills learned will be carried throughout a lifetime. The facts should be presented to them earlier in their life so it at least gets their brains wrapped around what a great way the trades can be to make a living.

Contact Mandl Today!

Contact us today to learn more about how a two year degree from Mandl can prepare you for a lucrative and lasting career that can open doors to many professional and life opportunities.

May is a great time for Health Care Education

Mandl School College of Allied Health Careers

May is a great time to start your health care education.  Few months during the year celebrate the hard work, dedication and importance of health care than May. There are 11+ days honoring awareness of health related issues and each deserves attention, especially from those who are in the health care industry or are studying to make health care a career. Here are a few to be aware of:

  • National Arthritis Month
  • Asthma and Food Allergy Awareness Month
  • Brain Cancer /Tumor Action Month
  • Osteoporosis Awareness & Prevention Month
  • Melanoma Skin Cancer Awareness Month
  • Lupus Awareness Month
  • Stroke Awareness Month
  • Bladder Cancer Awareness Month
  • Mental Health Awareness Month
  • Tuberous Sclerosis Awareness Month
  • Celiac Disease Awareness Month

National Nurses Week.

Another time to honor is National Nurses Day which actually becomes a full week of awareness.   Celebrations and receptions are held across the United States to honor the work of nurses from May 6th to May 12th.

Florence Nightingale

May 12, the final day of National Nurses Week, is the birthday of Florence Nightingale (1820-1910). The English nurse became known as the founder of professional nursing, especially due to her pioneering work during the Crimean War (1853-1856). Due to her habit of making rounds at night, Nightingale became known as “The Lady with the Lamp”.

National Nurses Week was first observed in October 1954, the 100th anniversary of Nightingale’s mission to Crimea. May 6 was introduced as the date for the observance in 1982.

Spring Classes are starting at Mandl School

Spring classes are starting shortly at Mandl School. While classes are filling fast, there is still time to register. The Health care industry is poised for growth faster than almost every other career. Contact Mandl today about how to get started. Call 212-247-3434 or email rsenser@mandl.edu for more information!

 

February is Heart Health Month

Hand making heart

This February is heart health month.  A time to think about a vital organ that has multiple meanings.  General health, spiritual health, love of friends and family and a time to think of others.  As one of NYC’s oldest medical training schools, we’ll focus on the health (and encourage the spirit and love!)

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. Every year, 1 in 4 deaths are caused by heart disease.  In the United States, the most common type of heart disease is coronary artery disease (CAD), which can lead to heart attack because of decreased blood flow.  Fortunately, you can greatly reduce your risk for CAD through lifestyle changes and, in some cases, medication.

The good news? Heart disease can often be prevented when people make healthy choices and manage their health conditions. Communities, health professionals, and families can work together to create opportunities for people to make healthier choices.

Make a difference in your community: Spread the word about strategies for preventing heart disease and encourage people to live heart healthy lives.

Heart Health

How can February American Heart Month make a difference?

We can use this month to raise awareness about heart disease and how people can prevent it — both at home and in the community.

Here are just a few ideas:

  • Encourage families to make small changes, like using spices to season their food instead of salt.
  • Motivate teachers and administrators to make physical activity a part of the school day. This can help students start good habits early.
  • Ask doctors and nurses to be leaders in their communities by speaking out about ways to prevent heart disease.

How can I help spread the word about Heart Health?

We’ve made it easier for you to make a difference. This toolkit is full of ideas to help you take action today. For example:

Cancer Patients and Fitness Trackers

Cancer Patient using Fitness tracker

Fitness trackers can be valuable tools for assessing the quality of life and daily functioning of cancer patients during treatment, a new study has found. The trackers, also known as wearable activity monitors, include commercial devices worn on the wrist that log a wearer’s step counts, stairs climbed, calories, heart rate and sleep.

As students of the Medical Field, keeping up to date with trends and discoveries in the medical industry make for a better career and better career advancement opportunities.  As we all know, Cancer is a growing concern in our population. Any insight into treatment can prove to be a life saver or lifestyle enhancer.

“One of the challenges in treating patients with advanced cancer is obtaining ongoing, timely, objective data about their physical status during therapy,” said Andrew Hendifar, MD, medical director for pancreatic cancer at the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute. “After all, patients typically spend most of their time at home or work, not in a clinic, and their health statuses change from day to day.”

Hendifar was the principal investigator and Gillian Gresham, PhD, postdoctoral scientist at the cancer institute, was the first author for the study, which was published online in the journal npj Digital Medicine.

Data Gathered Can Help Assess Cancer Patient Treatment

The study focused on 37 patients undergoing treatment for advanced cancer at Cedars-Sinai. They wore wrist-mounted fitness trackers throughout the study except when showering or swimming. Sets of activity data were collected for three consecutive visits during treatment. After the final clinical visit, patients were followed for six months to gather additional clinical and survival outcomes.

Investigators then compared data from the trackers with patients’ assessments of their own symptoms, including pain, fatigue and sleep quality, as collected from a National Institutes of Health questionnaire. These data sets also were compared with two common scales used to gauge physical status and overall health: the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status (ECOG) and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) scales.

Results suggested that objective data collected from wearable activity monitors can supplement and enhance current assessments of health status and physical function, which are limited by their subjectivity and potential for bias, Gresham said. In the study, increased daily step and stair activity correlated with more positive ratings of a patient’s condition on the provider surveys and lower rates of adverse events and hospitalization.

“Data gathered through advancements in technology has the potential to help physicians measure the impact of a particular treatment on a patient’s daily functioning,” Gresham said. “Furthermore, continuous activity monitoring may help predict and monitor treatment complications and allow for more timely and appropriate interventions.”

As a next step, investigators plan to study long-term use of the monitors in a larger, more diverse group of advanced cancer patients and correlate that data with clinical and self-reported outcomes. “Our hope is that findings from future studies with wearable activity monitors could lead to development of individualized treatment and exercise plans that may result in increased treatment tolerability and improved survival outcomes for patients,” Hendifar said.

“We are at the beginning of a revolution in healthcare in which digital wearables, coupled with broadband telecommunication, will allow remote monitoring of cancer patients and anticipate the need for intervention before symptoms occur,” said Dan Theodorescu, MD, PhD, director of the cancer institute. “This type of work has the potential to tailor our standard follow-up regimens for cancer to each patient, offering truly ‘precision follow-up’ that is better for patients, providers and society.”

For more information about the information above, please visit ScienceDaily

Interested in a career in Health Care or building a better career in the medical field? Speak to one of our admissions reps today at Mandl School, The College of Allied Health. Call 212-247-3434 anytime.

National HIV Testing Day 6/27

National HIV testing day is Wednesday June 27.

June 27th is an important day, it is National HIV Testing Day.  In an effort to keep our students at Mandl School, their families and everyone informed of news and events related to health care, it’s important to spread the word that June 27th is National HIV Testing Day. We have come so far in testing and treating HIV but there are still people living with HIV and may not know it.

National HIV Testing Day (NHTD), a day to encourage people to get tested for HIV, know their status, and get linked to care and treatment if they have HIV. This year’s theme, Doing It My Way, Testing for HIV, reminds us that each person has their own reasons why they test for HIV and their own unique ways of Doing It.

About 1.1 million people in the United States have HIV.

In the 1.1 million people, 1 in 7 don’t know they have HIV. Many people have HIV for years[1.86 MB] before they get a diagnosis. For those who are living with undiagnosed HIV, testing is the first step in maintaining a healthy life and reducing HIV transmission. CDC recommends that everyone between the ages of 13 and 64 get tested for HIV at least once as part of routine health care and those at high risk get tested at least once a year. Some sexually active gay and bisexual men may benefit from more frequent testing (every 3 to 6 months).

Get tested for HIV

Knowing your HIV status gives you powerful information to help keep you and your partner healthy. Join us on NHTD to raise awareness about the importance of HIV testing and early diagnosis of HIV. Share why and how you are getting tested for a chance to be featured on the Doing It My Way social wall.

Knowing your HIV status helps keep you and your partner healthy. Visit Doing It to learn more.

What Can You Do?

Get the facts. Learn about HIV, and share this information with your family, friends, and community.

Get tested. The only way to know for sure whether you have HIV is to get tested. To find a testing site near you, use the Doing It testing locator, text your ZIP code to KNOWIT (566948), or call 1-800-CDC-INFO. You can also use a home testing kit, available in drugstores or online.

Protect yourself and your partner. Today, we have powerful tools to prevent HIV and help people with HIV to stay healthy. If you have HIV, start treatment as soon as possible after you get a diagnosis. The most important thing you can do is take HIV medicine as prescribed by your doctor.

HIV medicine lowers the amount of virus (viral load) in your body, and taking it every day can make your viral load undetectable. If you get and keep an undetectable viral load, you can stay healthy for many years, and you have effectively no risk of transmitting HIV through sex to an HIV-negative partner. To make sure you keep an undetectable viral load, take your medicine as prescribed, and see your provider regularly to monitor your health.

There are many other actions you can take to prevent getting or transmitting HIV:

  • Use condoms the right way every time you have sex. Learn the right way to use a male condomor a female condom. Check out the condom locator to find condoms near you.
  • If you are HIV-negative but at high risk for HIV, take daily medicine to prevent HIV, called pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Use the PrEP locatorto find a PrEP provider in your area.
  • Talk to your doctor about post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP)if you think you have been exposed to HIV in the last 72 hours and are not on PrEP.
  • Choose less riskysexual behaviors.
  • Limit your number of sexual partners.
  • Get tested and treated for other sexually transmitted diseases.
  • Never share syringes or other equipment to inject drugs (works).
  • Remember, abstinence (not having sex) and not sharing syringes or works are the only 100% effective ways to prevent HIV.

You can learn more about how to protect yourself and your partners and get information tailored to meet your needs from CDC’s HIV Risk Reduction Tool(BETA).

Read full article here

At Mandl School, Our pledge is to provide our students with the finest Allied Health academic programs and training available in the New York City.  It is our mission to educate men and women, regardless of their backgrounds, to serve ably and effectively in the allied health industry. For more information about starting a career in Health Care, please contact us here or call 212-247-3434.